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Report Identifies PVC as Material Made in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

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Report Identifies PVC as Material Made in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

Report Identifies PVC as Material Made in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

As the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) effective date, June 21, 2022, quickly approaches a scholarly report published by the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice at Sheffield Hallam University, has been published linking Chinese building materials manufacturers to forced labor programs in Xinjiang.

The report states that seven major polyvinyl chloride (PVC) factories in Xinjiang use “transferred laborers.” Multiple reports describe the state-run labor transfer programs as coercive. The report states “we found that every PVC company operating in the Uyghur Region have engaged in state-sponsored labor transfer programs.”

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a fact sheet that identified chemicals (PVC is a chemical) and apparel/textiles (PVC is used in some fabrics), along with agricultural goods, as “top commodities imported into the U.S. from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR).”

PVC is a plastic used in a wide variety of products including, but not limited to:

  • PVC vinyl flooring
  • PVC pipe
  • Rayon
  • Spandex
  • Polyester
  • Footwear soles
  • Polyurethane
  • Household items

Customs and Border Protection recently released importer guidance for the UFLPA. As stated in the CBP UFLPA Fact sheet, “CBP will apply a rebuttable presumption that goods produced wholly or in part in the region or by entities identified in the enforcement strategy are not allowed to enter into the U.S. An importer may request an exception to the rebuttable presumption from CBP. This will require providing clear and convincing evidence that its imported merchandise was not mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part by forced labor.

Customs clearance can be complicated and failure to meet all of CBP and PGA requirements can be costly both in terms of delays and in penalties. As June 21st approaches and the UFLPA takes effect, let our experts at Norman Krieger, Inc. ensure you are staying compliant while importing your goods. If you have any questions, please contact us.